Exploration Images
Rosetta:  Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko rotating.  APOD caption:

 Explanation:  
Why does this comet’s nucleus have two components?

The surprising discovery that 
Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko has a double nucleus came 
late last week as 
ESA's robotic interplanetary spacecraft 
Rosetta continued 
its approach toward the ancient comet’s core.

Speculative ideas on how the double core was created include, currently, that 
Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko is actually the result of the merger of two comets, that 
the comet is a 
loose pile of rubble pulled apart by 
tidal forces, 
that ice evaporation on the comet has been asymmetric, 
or that the comet has undergone some sort of explosive event.

Pictured above, the comet’s unusual 5-km sized comet nucleus is seen rotating over the course of a few hours, with each frame taken 20-minutes apart.

Better images — and hopefully more refined theories — are expected as 
Rosetta 
is on track to enter orbit around 
Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko's nucleus early next month, 
and by the end of the year, if possible, 
land a probe on it. 


Image Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team; MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Rosetta: Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko rotating. APOD caption:

Explanation: Why does this comet’s nucleus have two components? The surprising discovery that Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko has a double nucleus came late last week as ESA's robotic interplanetary spacecraft Rosetta continued its approach toward the ancient comet’s core. Speculative ideas on how the double core was created include, currently, that Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko is actually the result of the merger of two comets, that the comet is a loose pile of rubble pulled apart by tidal forces, that ice evaporation on the comet has been asymmetric, or that the comet has undergone some sort of explosive event. Pictured above, the comet’s unusual 5-km sized comet nucleus is seen rotating over the course of a few hours, with each frame taken 20-minutes apart. Better images — and hopefully more refined theories — are expected as Rosetta is on track to enter orbit around Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko's nucleus early next month, and by the end of the year, if possible, land a probe on it.
Image Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team; MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Curiosity:  ChemCam image, July 12th 2014.

This image was taken by ChemCam: Remote Micro-Imager (CHEMCAM_RMI) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 686 (2014-07-12 01:56:13 UTC). 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

Curiosity: ChemCam image, July 12th 2014.

This image was taken by ChemCam: Remote Micro-Imager (CHEMCAM_RMI) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 686 (2014-07-12 01:56:13 UTC).
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

infinity-imagined:

Sunsets and sunrises seen from the International Space Station.

Yutu:  Undated photo of “Dragon Rock” on the moon, via China Space on FB
Yutu:  Undated photo of the lunar surface, via China Space on FB

becausegeeks:

By Diane Wild

image

T-46 seconds.

We could hear the anticipation in the voices crackling over the loudspeaker broadcasting from the control room: a calm voice with its rapid-fire listing of each system, and before the last syllable ended a new eager voice would chime in with “go”.

All systems…

canadian-space-agency:

NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman aboard the ISS: “One of my favorites – Orion’s belt rises through the atmosphere.”
Credit: Reid Wiseman/NASA

canadian-space-agency:

NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman aboard the ISS: “One of my favorites – Orion’s belt rises through the atmosphere.”

Credit: Reid Wiseman/NASA

nivaldoandrade:

SDO Lunar Transit, Prominence Eruption, and M-Class Flare by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.
fishstickmonkey:

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image at 11:25 a.m. local time (0825 Universal Time) on July 7, 2014. A thick plume of dust was blowing out from the dry interior of Sudan and across hundreds of kilometers of the Red Sea, with smaller plumes also visible over Saudi Arabia and Eritrea. Prevailing northwest winds over the water blew the plumes to the southeast. (via Dust Plume Over the Red Sea : Image of the Day)

fishstickmonkey:

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this image at 11:25 a.m. local time (0825 Universal Time) on July 7, 2014. A thick plume of dust was blowing out from the dry interior of Sudan and across hundreds of kilometers of the Red Sea, with smaller plumes also visible over Saudi Arabia and Eritrea. Prevailing northwest winds over the water blew the plumes to the southeast. (via Dust Plume Over the Red Sea : Image of the Day)

Mars rover Opportunity:  Rocks at Endeavour Crater, sol 3717

Mars rover Opportunity: Rocks at Endeavour Crater, sol 3717