Exploration Images
SDO:  Lunar Transit, July 26th 2014

On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. A lunar transit happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light. This image shows the blended result of two SDO wavelengths - one in 304 wavelength and another in 171 wavelength.

Image Credit: NASA/SDO

SDO: Lunar Transit, July 26th 2014

On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. A lunar transit happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light. This image shows the blended result of two SDO wavelengths - one in 304 wavelength and another in 171 wavelength.
Image Credit: NASA/SDO
Space selfie by Kaguya, the Japanese lunar probe.  

Image of high-gain antenna deployment. The right side is the SOL-BC that is part of the X-ray spectrometer.

Image credit: JAXA

Space selfie by Kaguya, the Japanese lunar probe.

Image of high-gain antenna deployment. The right side is the SOL-BC that is part of the X-ray spectrometer.
Image credit: JAXA
Space selfie by Shizuku (a Japanese climate monitoring satellite), showing the large rotating antenna for the AMSR2 microwave instrument.  May 2012.
Image credit: JAXA

Space selfie by Shizuku (a Japanese climate monitoring satellite), showing the large rotating antenna for the AMSR2 microwave instrument. May 2012.

Image credit: JAXA

Space selfie by Kiku-8 (a Japanese experimental communications satellite), showing one of its two large (19m x 17m) deployable antennas.  December 25-26, 2006.
Image credit: JAXA

Space selfie by Kiku-8 (a Japanese experimental communications satellite), showing one of its two large (19m x 17m) deployable antennas. December 25-26, 2006.

Image credit: JAXA

Space selfie by Sentinel 1A (a new European radar satellite)

An on-board camera sent back this image of one of Sentinel 1A’s solar arrays and part of the satellite’s C-band radar antenna after deployment during the craft’s first stage in orbit. 

Photo credit: ESA

Space selfie by Sentinel 1A (a new European radar satellite)

An on-board camera sent back this image of one of Sentinel 1A’s solar arrays and part of the satellite’s C-band radar antenna after deployment during the craft’s first stage in orbit.
Photo credit: ESA

ICO G1 antenna deployment, April 26th 2008. ICO G1 (now Echostar G1) is a communications satellite dedicated to mobile satellite phone service, and was a rare commercial payload on an Atlas 5 rocket (nearly all Atlas 5s are used for NASA or military spacecraft.)

Ranger VII: Lunar surface impact movie, July 31st 1964. The Ranger VII probe was the first fully successful US moon probe, and the first moon probe of any country to send back close up images of the lunar surface. It was launched July 28th 1964, 50 years ago today.

Mars rover Opportunity:  Microscopic Imager photo, sol 3743

Mars rover Opportunity: Microscopic Imager photo, sol 3743

Curiosity: View across Gale Crater, sol 696 (July 22nd, 2014).  The hills in the background are actually the rim of the crater, and the rover’s busy driving across the crater floor toward the mountain at the crater’s center.
This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 696 (2014-07-22 08:15:12 UTC). 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity: View across Gale Crater, sol 696 (July 22nd, 2014). The hills in the background are actually the rim of the crater, and the rover’s busy driving across the crater floor toward the mountain at the crater’s center.

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 696 (2014-07-22 08:15:12 UTC).
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Curiosity:  Slopes of Mt. Sharp (Aeolis Mons), Sol 696 (July 22nd, 2014)
This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 696 (2014-07-22 08:07:04 UTC). 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity: Slopes of Mt. Sharp (Aeolis Mons), Sol 696 (July 22nd, 2014)

This image was taken by Mastcam: Left (MAST_LEFT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 696 (2014-07-22 08:07:04 UTC).
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS