Exploration Images

GRAIL-A (“Ebb”): MoonKam video, December 14th 2012

This is the final video sequence captured by the GRAIL-A (“Ebb”) MoonKAM system a few days before the spacecraft impacted the Moon on a mountain near the lunar north pole on Dec 17. At the time this video was taken, both GRAIL spacecraft were about 6 miles (10 km) above the northern hemisphere of the Moon’s far side, in the vicinity of the Jackson impact crater. This imagery was acquired as part of a final checkout of spacecraft equipment prior to its planned impact.

GRAIL-A (“Ebb”): MoonKam video from December 14th 2012 (by RocketCamByEcliptic )

This is the final video sequence captured by the GRAIL-A (“Ebb”) MoonKAM system a few days before the spacecraft impacted the Moon on a mountain near the lunar north pole on Dec 17. At the time this video was taken, both GRAIL spacecraft were about 6 miles (10 km) above the northern hemisphere of the Moon’s far side, in the vicinity of the Jackson impact crater. This imagery was acquired as part of a final checkout of spacecraft equipment prior to its planned impact.
Flow (GRAIL-B):  MoonKam image taken November 16th, 2012.
GRAIL (Flow):  Most recent MoonKam image, dated 6/2/2012, at the end of the primary mission.  Not sure whether they’ll be taking more MoonKam images during the extended mission, which runs through December.

GRAIL (Flow): Most recent MoonKam image, dated 6/2/2012, at the end of the primary mission. Not sure whether they’ll be taking more MoonKam images during the extended mission, which runs through December.

GRAIL Ebb: MoonKAM image #8096, taken 20 March 2012
GRAIL Ebb: MoonKAM image #56, taken 16 March 2012

GRAIL Mission Returns First Video of Moon’s Far Side (by JPLnews)

Grail Names Announced (by NASAtelevision)

A class of fourth graders from the Emily Dickinson School in Bozeman, Mont. has helped NASA choose new names for its twin lunar orbiting spacecraft GRAIL-A and —B. The new names — Ebb and Flow were announced during a media event at NASA headquarters in Washington. The GRAIL mission will enable scientists to better understand the moon’s gravitational field as well as what goes on below its surface. The data gathered is expected to increase our knowledge about how Earth and its rocky neighbors in the inner solar system developed into the diverse worlds we see today.