Exploration Images
Meanwhile on Mars, March 27th 2014…

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 582 (2014-03-27 05:29:29 UTC). 


Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Meanwhile on Mars, March 27th 2014

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 582 (2014-03-27 05:29:29 UTC).
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Cassini image of Saturn, March 26th 2014.  

W00087435.jpg was taken on March 26, 2014 and received on Earth March 27, 2014. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 1,815,269 miles (2,921,393 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the CB2 and IRP0 filters.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Cassini image of Saturn, March 26th 2014.

W00087435.jpg was taken on March 26, 2014 and received on Earth March 27, 2014. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 1,815,269 miles (2,921,393 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the CB2 and IRP0 filters.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Van Allen Probe A: Signal from the Earth’s radiation belts, March 2nd 2014.

The Van Allen Probes EMFISIS Waves instruments detect electric and magnetic components of plasma waves and radio waves that range through frequencies that include those audible to humans. Although these differ from the pressure waves that we normally think of as sound, they can be used to drive speakers and produce sounds we can hear.

These signals were recorded by the Van Allen Probes A spacecraft EMFISIS Waves instrument on 2014-03-02 during hour 06 UTC. The measurements of three orthogonal magnetic antennas Bu, Bv, and Bw were combined to make this 48-second stereo audio recording.
Cassini: Saturn, February 28th 2014.

W00086974.jpg was taken on February 28, 2014 and received on Earth February 28, 2014. The camera was pointing toward TELESTO, and the image was taken using the CB2 and CL2 filters.

Cassini: Saturn, February 28th 2014.

W00086974.jpg was taken on February 28, 2014 and received on Earth February 28, 2014. The camera was pointing toward TELESTO, and the image was taken using the CB2 and CL2 filters.
Cassini:  Saturn & rings, February 17th 2014.

W00086879.jpg was taken on February 17, 2014 and received on Earth February 18, 2014. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 1,703,039 miles (2,740,775 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the CB2 and CL2 filters. 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Cassini: Saturn & rings, February 17th 2014.

W00086879.jpg was taken on February 17, 2014 and received on Earth February 18, 2014. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 1,703,039 miles (2,740,775 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the CB2 and CL2 filters.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Hurricane Esther from the TIROS 3 weather satellite, September 10th 1961.  This was the first hurricane ever discovered from orbit.  Posting this now because a stage from the Delta-1 rocket that launched TIROS 3 is predicted to finally reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up on or around February 19th.  It’s got to be one of the oldest objects still in orbit, and it’s a shame there’s no practical way to bring it back gently for the Smithsonian or something.

Hurricane Esther from the TIROS 3 weather satellite, September 10th 1961. This was the first hurricane ever discovered from orbit. Posting this now because a stage from the Delta-1 rocket that launched TIROS 3 is predicted to finally reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up on or around February 19th. It’s got to be one of the oldest objects still in orbit, and it’s a shame there’s no practical way to bring it back gently for the Smithsonian or something.

LADEE Star Tracker Image with Craters Lichtenberg A and Schiaparelli E
The image shown here was acquired on Feb. 8, 2014, around 23:45 UTC, while LADEE was carrying out atmospheric measurements. A series of five images were taken at one-minute intervals, and caught features in the northern western hemisphere of the moon. LADEE was traveling approximately 60 miles (100 km) per minute along its orbit. All images were taken during lunar night, but with Earthshine illuminating the surface. This final image views craters Lichtenberg A and Schiaparelli E in the smooth mare basalt plains of Western Oceanus Procellarum, west of the Aristarchus plateau. 
Image credit: NASA Ames

LADEE Star Tracker Image with Craters Lichtenberg A and Schiaparelli E

The image shown here was acquired on Feb. 8, 2014, around 23:45 UTC, while LADEE was carrying out atmospheric measurements. A series of five images were taken at one-minute intervals, and caught features in the northern western hemisphere of the moon. LADEE was traveling approximately 60 miles (100 km) per minute along its orbit. All images were taken during lunar night, but with Earthshine illuminating the surface. This final image views craters Lichtenberg A and Schiaparelli E in the smooth mare basalt plains of Western Oceanus Procellarum, west of the Aristarchus plateau.
Image credit: NASA Ames
LADEE Star Tracker Image with Golgi and Zinner Craters
The image shown here was acquired on Feb. 8, 2014, around 23:45 UTC, while LADEE was carrying out atmospheric measurements. A series of five images were taken at one-minute intervals, and caught features in the northern western hemisphere of the moon. LADEE was traveling approximately 60 miles (100 km) per minute along its orbit. All images were taken during lunar night, but with Earthshine illuminating the surface. This fourth image captures Golgi, about four miles (6 km) in diameter, and three-mile-wide (5 km) Zinner.
 Image credit: NASA Ames

LADEE Star Tracker Image with Golgi and Zinner Craters

The image shown here was acquired on Feb. 8, 2014, around 23:45 UTC, while LADEE was carrying out atmospheric measurements. A series of five images were taken at one-minute intervals, and caught features in the northern western hemisphere of the moon. LADEE was traveling approximately 60 miles (100 km) per minute along its orbit. All images were taken during lunar night, but with Earthshine illuminating the surface. This fourth image captures Golgi, about four miles (6 km) in diameter, and three-mile-wide (5 km) Zinner.
Image credit: NASA Ames
LADEE Star Tracker Image with Montes Agricola and Raman Crater
The image shown here was acquired on Feb. 8, 2014, around 23:45 UTC, while LADEE was carrying out atmospheric measurements. A series of five images were taken at one-minute intervals, and caught features in the northern western hemisphere of the moon. LADEE was traveling approximately 60 miles (100 km) per minute along its orbit. All images were taken during lunar night, but with Earthshine illuminating the surface. This third image caught a minor lunar mountain range, Montes Agricola, which is northwest of the large bright crater Aristarchus (out of view), as well as the flat-floored crater Raman, about six miles (10 km) diameter. 
Image credit: NASA Ames

LADEE Star Tracker Image with Montes Agricola and Raman Crater

The image shown here was acquired on Feb. 8, 2014, around 23:45 UTC, while LADEE was carrying out atmospheric measurements. A series of five images were taken at one-minute intervals, and caught features in the northern western hemisphere of the moon. LADEE was traveling approximately 60 miles (100 km) per minute along its orbit. All images were taken during lunar night, but with Earthshine illuminating the surface. This third image caught a minor lunar mountain range, Montes Agricola, which is northwest of the large bright crater Aristarchus (out of view), as well as the flat-floored crater Raman, about six miles (10 km) diameter.
Image credit: NASA Ames