Exploration Images
Cassini  Polar hexagon & rings of Saturn, August 24th, 2014

W00089247.jpg was taken on August 23, 2014 and received on Earth August 24, 2014. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 1,126,363 miles (1,812,706 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the MT2 and IRP0 filters.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
A list of Cassini camera filters at UMSF explains that “IRP0” is the “Infrared 0º polarizer” filter, while “MT2” is “Methane band 2”

Cassini Polar hexagon & rings of Saturn, August 24th, 2014

W00089247.jpg was taken on August 23, 2014 and received on Earth August 24, 2014. The camera was pointing toward SATURN at approximately 1,126,363 miles (1,812,706 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the MT2 and IRP0 filters.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

A list of Cassini camera filters at UMSF explains that “IRP0” is the “Infrared 0º polarizer” filter, while “MT2” is “Methane band 2”

SDO: "Amazing Filament"

The Sun sported a very long filament (over 30 times the size of Earth) that angled diagonally across its surface for over a week (July 31 – Aug. 6, 2014). Filaments are clouds of cooler gas suspended above the Sun’s surface by magnetic forces. They are notoriously unstable and often break apart in just hours or days. So far, this one has held together as it rotated along with the Sun for over a week. The images were taken in the 193 Angstrom wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light and were tinted red instead of its usual brown hue.
Credit: NASA SDO

"Project Gemini Science Program" (1965) - Another vintage NASA short film.

Stardust:  Microscopic track of an interstellar dust particle.

The largest interstellar dust track found in the Stardust aerogel collectors was this 35 micron-long hole produced by a 3 picogram speck of dust that was probably traveling so fast that it vaporized upon impact. The other two likely interstellar dust grains were traveling more slowly and remained in

Image Credit: UC Berkeley/Andrew Westphal.

Stardust: Microscopic track of an interstellar dust particle.

The largest interstellar dust track found in the Stardust aerogel collectors was this 35 micron-long hole produced by a 3 picogram speck of dust that was probably traveling so fast that it vaporized upon impact. The other two likely interstellar dust grains were traveling more slowly and remained in
Image Credit: UC Berkeley/Andrew Westphal.

"The Age of Space Transportation" (1975) - NASA short film about how awesome the Space Shuttle was going to be.

Opportunity:  Sol 3749 Navcam image, on the way to a high point along “Cape Tribulation”, on the rim of Endeavour crater.

Opportunity: Sol 3749 Navcam image, on the way to a high point along “Cape Tribulation”, on the rim of Endeavour crater.

Curiosity:  ChemCam image shortly after zapping some sand, August 9th 2014

This image was taken by ChemCam: Remote Micro-Imager (CHEMCAM_RMI) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 714 (2014-08-09 17:10:26 UTC). 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

Curiosity: ChemCam image shortly after zapping some sand, August 9th 2014

This image was taken by ChemCam: Remote Micro-Imager (CHEMCAM_RMI) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 714 (2014-08-09 17:10:26 UTC).
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL
Curiosity:  Tilted layered rocks, with hills in the distance.  August 7th 2014

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 712 (2014-08-07 14:31:01 UTC). 

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity: Tilted layered rocks, with hills in the distance. August 7th 2014

This image was taken by Mastcam: Right (MAST_RIGHT) onboard NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 712 (2014-08-07 14:31:01 UTC).
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

"Jupiter Odyssey", vintage NASA film about the Pioneer 10 probe, which flew past Jupiter in December 1973