Exploration Images
kaiyves:

freshphotons:

80,000 volts through a flower, Via.

Woah!

kaiyves:

freshphotons:

80,000 volts through a flower, Via.

Woah!

thisisandres:

Amazing footage of an Iceberg imploding and sending chunks of ice flying toward tourists.

dailysciencething:

This is Velella velella. Try saying that six times fast. Note that it’s essentially a little air bubble with a hard sail (really, more like a series of tubes filled with air), and underneath are tentacles that the velella use to feed. They float on the surface of the sea and wander over…

reformyourself:

“Ninety percent of all rubbish floating in the world’s oceans is plastic. In 2006, UN environment programs estimated that every square mile of ocean contained at least 46,000 pieces of floating plastic. Floating in the surface layer are plastic products, tons of drift nets, plastic bags, packing straps and common household items like soap, televisions, automobile tires and deodorant bottles. One suspected spill of plastic bags was measured to have covered 10 miles of ocean.
Beneath the waves, vast coral reefs and colonies, some thousands of years old, house more than 25 percent of all marine fish species. These unique and crucial habitats form an integral part of the oceans systems and yet they too are struggling to manage to cope with the impacts of industries such as tourism, reef fish trades and the taking of coral, which supplies those who think that this coral would look more attractive as home décor or jewelry and consequently support a significant trade in its collection and processing around the world.”

Taking care of the planet is as important - if not more important - than taking care of our bodies.  If you are blogging about health, nutrition, and fitness because you enjoy the taste of locally-grown, fresh vegetables and grass-fed beef, the health of our planet concerns you.  If you love to run because you enjoy the feel of the air and sun on your skin, you should have an appreciation for nature, because we’re all a part of it.  If you spend more than a few hours in front of your computer screen every day, I suggest that you make it a goal in 2012 to get outside and learn something new about the nearest wildlife reserve or national park.  If you live near the ocean, go rent some snorkeling equipment or flip over some rocks at the beach and you’ll see a world that exists entirely separate from you, a world that supports creatures of all kinds and sizes, and these ecosystems require our responsibility as co-inhabitants of earth to thrive.  Buy less, use less, and appreciate the small things in life.  
There’s no excuse for miles of tires to found be on the ocean floor.  Drive less, buy a bike, do whatever you can to reduce your impact on the our earth’s bounty.  It starts with you - reform yourself.

Read MORE.

reformyourself:

“Ninety percent of all rubbish floating in the world’s oceans is plastic. In 2006, UN environment programs estimated that every square mile of ocean contained at least 46,000 pieces of floating plastic. Floating in the surface layer are plastic products, tons of drift nets, plastic bags, packing straps and common household items like soap, televisions, automobile tires and deodorant bottles. One suspected spill of plastic bags was measured to have covered 10 miles of ocean.

Beneath the waves, vast coral reefs and colonies, some thousands of years old, house more than 25 percent of all marine fish species. These unique and crucial habitats form an integral part of the oceans systems and yet they too are struggling to manage to cope with the impacts of industries such as tourism, reef fish trades and the taking of coral, which supplies those who think that this coral would look more attractive as home décor or jewelry and consequently support a significant trade in its collection and processing around the world.”

Taking care of the planet is as important - if not more important - than taking care of our bodies.  If you are blogging about health, nutrition, and fitness because you enjoy the taste of locally-grown, fresh vegetables and grass-fed beef, the health of our planet concerns you.  If you love to run because you enjoy the feel of the air and sun on your skin, you should have an appreciation for nature, because we’re all a part of it.  If you spend more than a few hours in front of your computer screen every day, I suggest that you make it a goal in 2012 to get outside and learn something new about the nearest wildlife reserve or national park.  If you live near the ocean, go rent some snorkeling equipment or flip over some rocks at the beach and you’ll see a world that exists entirely separate from you, a world that supports creatures of all kinds and sizes, and these ecosystems require our responsibility as co-inhabitants of earth to thrive.  Buy less, use less, and appreciate the small things in life.  

There’s no excuse for miles of tires to found be on the ocean floor.  Drive less, buy a bike, do whatever you can to reduce your impact on the our earth’s bounty.  It starts with you - reform yourself.

Read MORE.

purpleinwinter:

by Alexander Semenov
m0iety:

Soufriere Hills Volcano Resumes Activity (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

m0iety:

Soufriere Hills Volcano Resumes Activity (by NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

The world’s tiniest frogs, the size of a Tic Tac, discovered in New Guinea (Mongabay.com, 16 December 2011)

Citation:  Kraus, F. (2010) New genus of diminutive microhylid frogs from Papua New Guinea. ZooKeys 48 (2010) : 39-59. doi: 10.3897/zookeys.48.446

The world’s tiniest frogs, the size of a Tic Tac, discovered in New Guinea (Mongabay.com, 16 December 2011)

Citation: Kraus, F. (2010) New genus of diminutive microhylid frogs from Papua New Guinea. ZooKeys 48 (2010) : 39-59. doi: 10.3897/zookeys.48.446

2011 Elwha River Benthic Survey in the Strait of Juan de Fuca (by ssheldrake)

ROV underwater voyage (by natureconservancy)

Marine Remotely Operated Vehicle (by natureconservancy)