Exploration Images
1944 chart of the electromagnetic spectrum, via @treelobsters and the LLNL Flickr stream.  Full (readable) size is here.

1944 chart of the electromagnetic spectrum, via @treelobsters and the LLNL Flickr stream. Full (readable) size is here.

Curiosity:  CheMin x-ray diffraction observation of Martian soil.  From Bish et al. X-Ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale Crater

Curiosity: CheMin x-ray diffraction observation of Martian soil. From Bish et al. X-Ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale Crater

spaceplasma:

A microquasar makes a giant Manatee Nebula

A new view of a 20,000-year old supernova remnant demonstrates the upgraded imaging power of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and provides more clues to the history of this giant cloud that resembles a beloved endangered species, the Florida Manatee.

W50 is one of the largest supernova remnants ever viewed by the VLA. At nearly 700 light years across, it covers two degrees on the sky – that’s the span of four full Moons!

Turbulent History

The enormous W50 cloud formed when a giant star, 18,000 light years away in the constellation of Aquila, exploded as a supernova around twenty thousand years ago, sending its outer gases flying outward in an expanding bubble.

The remaining, gravitationally-crushed relic of that giant star, most likely a black hole, feeds on gas from a very close, companion star. The cannibalized gas collects in a disk around the black hole. The disk and black hole’s network of powerful magnetic field lines acts like an enormous railroad system to snag charged particles out of the disk and channel them outward in powerful jets traveling at nearly the speed of light. This system of a black hole and its feeder star shines brightly in both radio waves and X-rays and is known collectively as the SS433 microquasar.

Over time, the microquasar’s jets have forced their way through the expanding gases of the W50 bubble, eventually punching bulges outward on either side. The jets also wobble, like an unstable spinning top, and blaze vivid corkscrew patterns across the inflating bulges.

Full Article→

Credits: NRAO/AUI/NSF, K. Golap, M. Goss; NASA’s Wide Field Survey Explorer (WISE) / Tracy Colson.

beautifulmars:

From a message via our website: So, lets see if I got this right. You guys got US tax money to send an expensive satellite to Mars to taks pretty Hi-Def pictures for geo-physical study for why????? 
We politely responded, but we often encounter folks with the belief that space exploration, and NASA in particular, is a gigantic waste of taxpayer money. NASA’s funding is less than 1 percent of the federal total. While it’s still a lot of money, it’s, well, just 1 percent. Missions have to compete for a shrinking pool of dollars, and older missions like ours, lose funding each year through attrition. That’s just the nature of the work.
But we don’t think these images are a waste of time. 

beautifulmars:

From a message via our website: So, lets see if I got this right. You guys got US tax money to send an expensive satellite to Mars to taks pretty Hi-Def pictures for geo-physical study for why????? 

We politely responded, but we often encounter folks with the belief that space exploration, and NASA in particular, is a gigantic waste of taxpayer money. NASA’s funding is less than 1 percent of the federal total. While it’s still a lot of money, it’s, well, just 1 percent. Missions have to compete for a shrinking pool of dollars, and older missions like ours, lose funding each year through attrition. That’s just the nature of the work.

But we don’t think these images are a waste of time. 

beautifulmars:

Possible Small Crater Chain: uahirise.org/ESP_028975_2250

beautifulmars:

Possible Small Crater Chain: uahirise.org/ESP_028975_2250

drueisms:

Photo Shows Far Side of Moon Like Never Before| NASA & Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

bouncingdodecahedrons:

Vintage Koppel postcards from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Postcard captions:

  1. The Apollo/Saturn V facilities vehicle moves out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center, on its way to launch complex 39, Pad-A.
  2. Launch Site of American Astronauts.
  3. The Apollo/Saturn V facilities vehicle moves out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center, on its way to launch complex 39, Pad-A.
  4. Apollo 4, the first space vehicle in NASA’s Apollo/Saturn V program, leaves the Vehicle Assembly Building for erection at Pad-A of complex 39.
  5. The Apollo 11 Saturn V space vehicle, atop the transporter, passes scenic Florida landscape along Crawler Way during rollout from the Vehicle Assembly Building. The transporter traveled 3.5 miles to Launch Complex 39-A in slightly more than seven hours.
  6. The Apollo 11 crew leaves the Manned Spacecraft Operations Building and enters van which will take them to Pad 39-A. Astronauts Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins entered their Apollo 11 space vehicle, which lifted off 9:32 a.m., July 16, 1969.
michaelvthesecond:

Hadley Delta 
In this historical photo from the U.S. space agency, Astronaut David R. Scott, mission commander, with tongs and gnomon in hand, studies a boulder on the slope of Hadley Delta during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity on August 1, 1971. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) or Rover is in right foreground. View is looking slightly south of west. “Bennett Hill” is at extreme right. Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, took this photograph.
[Image:NASA/James B. Irwin]

michaelvthesecond:

Hadley Delta 

In this historical photo from the U.S. space agency, Astronaut David R. Scott, mission commander, with tongs and gnomon in hand, studies a boulder on the slope of Hadley Delta during the Apollo 15 lunar surface extravehicular activity on August 1, 1971. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) or Rover is in right foreground. View is looking slightly south of west. “Bennett Hill” is at extreme right. Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, took this photograph.

[Image:NASA/James B. Irwin]

michaelvthesecond:

Apollo 9 First Lunar Module Flight
Apollo 9 launched March 3, 1969, with a crucial mission: to fly the lunar module for the first time. The spacecraft had been tested successfully during the unmanned Apollo 5 mission. This would be the first time a crew would be aboard the spacecraft.
The crew spent 10 days in low Earth orbit testing the lunar module’s engines, navigation systems and docking maneuvers, as well as backpack life support systems. And while the module performed well, the crew had to scrap a spacewalk after one of the astronauts fell ill during the flight. 
[Image:NASA]

michaelvthesecond:

Apollo 9 First Lunar Module Flight

Apollo 9 launched March 3, 1969, with a crucial mission: to fly the lunar module for the first time. The spacecraft had been tested successfully during the unmanned Apollo 5 mission. This would be the first time a crew would be aboard the spacecraft.

The crew spent 10 days in low Earth orbit testing the lunar module’s engines, navigation systems and docking maneuvers, as well as backpack life support systems. And while the module performed well, the crew had to scrap a spacewalk after one of the astronauts fell ill during the flight.
 

[Image:NASA]

thekidshouldseethis:

A downward lightning negative ground flash captured at 7,207 images per second. A negative stepped leader emerges from the cloud and connects with the ground forming a return stroke.

From ZT Research, who is “trying to figure out how lightning works.”

via Stellar.