Exploration Images
reformyourself:

“Ninety percent of all rubbish floating in the world’s oceans is plastic. In 2006, UN environment programs estimated that every square mile of ocean contained at least 46,000 pieces of floating plastic. Floating in the surface layer are plastic products, tons of drift nets, plastic bags, packing straps and common household items like soap, televisions, automobile tires and deodorant bottles. One suspected spill of plastic bags was measured to have covered 10 miles of ocean.
Beneath the waves, vast coral reefs and colonies, some thousands of years old, house more than 25 percent of all marine fish species. These unique and crucial habitats form an integral part of the oceans systems and yet they too are struggling to manage to cope with the impacts of industries such as tourism, reef fish trades and the taking of coral, which supplies those who think that this coral would look more attractive as home décor or jewelry and consequently support a significant trade in its collection and processing around the world.”

Taking care of the planet is as important - if not more important - than taking care of our bodies.  If you are blogging about health, nutrition, and fitness because you enjoy the taste of locally-grown, fresh vegetables and grass-fed beef, the health of our planet concerns you.  If you love to run because you enjoy the feel of the air and sun on your skin, you should have an appreciation for nature, because we’re all a part of it.  If you spend more than a few hours in front of your computer screen every day, I suggest that you make it a goal in 2012 to get outside and learn something new about the nearest wildlife reserve or national park.  If you live near the ocean, go rent some snorkeling equipment or flip over some rocks at the beach and you’ll see a world that exists entirely separate from you, a world that supports creatures of all kinds and sizes, and these ecosystems require our responsibility as co-inhabitants of earth to thrive.  Buy less, use less, and appreciate the small things in life.  
There’s no excuse for miles of tires to found be on the ocean floor.  Drive less, buy a bike, do whatever you can to reduce your impact on the our earth’s bounty.  It starts with you - reform yourself.

Read MORE.

reformyourself:

“Ninety percent of all rubbish floating in the world’s oceans is plastic. In 2006, UN environment programs estimated that every square mile of ocean contained at least 46,000 pieces of floating plastic. Floating in the surface layer are plastic products, tons of drift nets, plastic bags, packing straps and common household items like soap, televisions, automobile tires and deodorant bottles. One suspected spill of plastic bags was measured to have covered 10 miles of ocean.

Beneath the waves, vast coral reefs and colonies, some thousands of years old, house more than 25 percent of all marine fish species. These unique and crucial habitats form an integral part of the oceans systems and yet they too are struggling to manage to cope with the impacts of industries such as tourism, reef fish trades and the taking of coral, which supplies those who think that this coral would look more attractive as home décor or jewelry and consequently support a significant trade in its collection and processing around the world.”

Taking care of the planet is as important - if not more important - than taking care of our bodies.  If you are blogging about health, nutrition, and fitness because you enjoy the taste of locally-grown, fresh vegetables and grass-fed beef, the health of our planet concerns you.  If you love to run because you enjoy the feel of the air and sun on your skin, you should have an appreciation for nature, because we’re all a part of it.  If you spend more than a few hours in front of your computer screen every day, I suggest that you make it a goal in 2012 to get outside and learn something new about the nearest wildlife reserve or national park.  If you live near the ocean, go rent some snorkeling equipment or flip over some rocks at the beach and you’ll see a world that exists entirely separate from you, a world that supports creatures of all kinds and sizes, and these ecosystems require our responsibility as co-inhabitants of earth to thrive.  Buy less, use less, and appreciate the small things in life.  

There’s no excuse for miles of tires to found be on the ocean floor.  Drive less, buy a bike, do whatever you can to reduce your impact on the our earth’s bounty.  It starts with you - reform yourself.

Read MORE.

purpleinwinter:

by Alexander Semenov
First Recording of Deep-Sea Fish Reveals Grunts & Quacks

"Sirenia Shadows" (by Built by Wildman) (via @io9)

"Emerging from the shadows and effortlessly gliding through their domain, the mermaids take central stage in Crystal River. Become entranced with the beauty and grace of the endangered West Indian Manatees of Florida."

NASA | An Introduction to Aqua (by NASAexplorer)

The first in a series of episodes looking at the instruments and applications of the Aqua satellite.

Swains Island (by sanctuaries)

A team from National Marine Sanctuaries visited the remote privately owned Swains Island, near America Samoa. Many thanks again to the Jennings family for allowing us to video this amazing location.

Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary Free Dive (by sanctuaries)

NOAAs Office of National Marine Sanctuaries video specialist Paul Chetirkin recently shot this during a free dive in Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary in American Samoa.

Monterey Bay Harbor Anemones & Jellies (by sanctuaries)

Beautiful underwater footage in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary featuring anemones, jellyfish and more.


Credit: Paul Chetirkin, NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries
Terra: Phytoplankton bloom off South Africa  (MODIS Image of the Day, January 5th 2012)

Off the coast of South Africa, near where the South Atlantic meets the Southern Indian Ocean, a massive summer phytoplankton bloom colored the waters with a swirl of turquoise, green and white in late December 2011. Although this circular bloom has the appearance of a precious antique gaming marble, it is actually the result of millions of tiny plant-like organisms (phytoplankton) which are growing where nutrient-rich waters mix together.

Each spring and summer, lengthening sunshine comes to the southern oceans, providing light to spur the growth of these microscopic plants. The lengthening light also melts sea ice, which can release additional nutrients into the sea. Blooms such as this one become a banquet for krill, fish and other marine species which survive in these cool waters.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image on December 26, 2011 as it passed over the region.


Image Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC

Terra: Phytoplankton bloom off South Africa (MODIS Image of the Day, January 5th 2012)

Off the coast of South Africa, near where the South Atlantic meets the Southern Indian Ocean, a massive summer phytoplankton bloom colored the waters with a swirl of turquoise, green and white in late December 2011. Although this circular bloom has the appearance of a precious antique gaming marble, it is actually the result of millions of tiny plant-like organisms (phytoplankton) which are growing where nutrient-rich waters mix together.

Each spring and summer, lengthening sunshine comes to the southern oceans, providing light to spur the growth of these microscopic plants. The lengthening light also melts sea ice, which can release additional nutrients into the sea. Blooms such as this one become a banquet for krill, fish and other marine species which survive in these cool waters.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite captured this true-color image on December 26, 2011 as it passed over the region.
Image Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC