Exploration Images
Hurricane Esther from the TIROS 3 weather satellite, September 10th 1961.  This was the first hurricane ever discovered from orbit.  Posting this now because a stage from the Delta-1 rocket that launched TIROS 3 is predicted to finally reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up on or around February 19th.  It’s got to be one of the oldest objects still in orbit, and it’s a shame there’s no practical way to bring it back gently for the Smithsonian or something.

Hurricane Esther from the TIROS 3 weather satellite, September 10th 1961. This was the first hurricane ever discovered from orbit. Posting this now because a stage from the Delta-1 rocket that launched TIROS 3 is predicted to finally reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up on or around February 19th. It’s got to be one of the oldest objects still in orbit, and it’s a shame there’s no practical way to bring it back gently for the Smithsonian or something.

Satellite images of Cyclone Phailin as it approaches India & Bangladesh.  Fingers crossed for everyone in the region.  The false-color images on the bottom are from TRMM, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. (via @RyanMaue)

Satellite images of Cyclone Phailin as it approaches India & Bangladesh. Fingers crossed for everyone in the region. The false-color images on the bottom are from TRMM, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. (via @RyanMaue)

Elektro-L No.1:  Africa, Middle East, & Indian Ocean, August 10th 2013.

Image credit:  NTs OMZ / Roscosmos

Elektro-L No.1: Africa, Middle East, & Indian Ocean, August 10th 2013.

Image credit: NTs OMZ / Roscosmos

Typhoon Jewalat from Russian weather satellite Elektro-L No. 1, September 2012

(via UnmannedSpaceflight.com)

Typhoon Jewalat from Russian weather satellite Elektro-L No. 1, September 2012

(via UnmannedSpaceflight.com)

MRO MARCI Weather Report for the Week of 15 JULY 2013 – 21 JULY 2013


Martian weather between 15 July 2013 and 21 July 2013:

The MARCI acquires a global view of the red planet and its weather patterns every day. Please click and play the Quicktime movie (.mov file) to see how the weather on Mars changed during this time.

One regional dust storm developed in the northern hemisphere along the Acidalia storm-track. The storm began in the Tempe-Acidalia region along the edge of the seasonal north polar cap and propagated southward into Acidalia-Chryse into northern reaches of Xanthe, with a narrow eastern arm extending over western Arabia. The storm spared the Opportunity rover site by staying north of the equator. At the same time in the southern hemisphere, a series of storms initiated in southern Sirenum, passed to the south and over Argyre, and eventually extended in an west-east band across Noachis at southern mid-latitudes. By the end of the week, the storms had dissipated, leaving behind a residual dust haze. Elsewhere, local storm activity occurred in Utopia, Amazonis, and over the Phlegra Montes. Diffuse water ice clouds were present across most latitudes, with concentrations in the equatorial regions, Tyrrhena, and over Tharsis and Alba Patera. Meanwhile, afternoon skies remained relatively clear and storm-free over the Opportunity rover site at Meridiani and the Curiosity rover site in Gale.


Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems
AIMS:  Noctilucent clouds over the north pole, 7/8/2013
Aqua:  Hurricane Dalila (04E) off Mexico, 7/2/2013 (posted 7/13/2013)

On July 2, 2013 the tropical storm that had been hugging the coast of Mexico turned towards open ocean and strengthened into a Category 1 hurricane. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image at 20:55 UTC (4:55 p.m. EDT) on that same day, while the storm hovered over the eastern Pacific Ocean west of the Mexican state of Jalisco.

At the time the image was captured, Hurricane Dalila had a cloud-filled, ragged central eye and bands of thunderstorms in the northern and southern quadrants. Just five minutes later, at 21:00 UTC (5:00 p.m. EDT), the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported that Dalila had maximum sustained winds of 65 mph and was located about 165 mi (260 km) west southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico.

After dumping considerable rain along Mexico’s coast, the slow-moving storm continued to move westward out to sea and began to weaken due to easterly wind shear and movement into drier air. By the afternoon of July 3, the NHC downgraded Dalila to a tropical storm. By the afternoon of July 7, Dalila became a post-tropical cyclone and the NHC ceased to issue advisories on the storm.

The storm was a rain-maker for Mexico, and caused flooding in many regions. However, no major damage was reported.


Image Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC

Aqua: Hurricane Dalila (04E) off Mexico, 7/2/2013 (posted 7/13/2013)

On July 2, 2013 the tropical storm that had been hugging the coast of Mexico turned towards open ocean and strengthened into a Category 1 hurricane. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image at 20:55 UTC (4:55 p.m. EDT) on that same day, while the storm hovered over the eastern Pacific Ocean west of the Mexican state of Jalisco.

At the time the image was captured, Hurricane Dalila had a cloud-filled, ragged central eye and bands of thunderstorms in the northern and southern quadrants. Just five minutes later, at 21:00 UTC (5:00 p.m. EDT), the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reported that Dalila had maximum sustained winds of 65 mph and was located about 165 mi (260 km) west southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico.

After dumping considerable rain along Mexico’s coast, the slow-moving storm continued to move westward out to sea and began to weaken due to easterly wind shear and movement into drier air. By the afternoon of July 3, the NHC downgraded Dalila to a tropical storm. By the afternoon of July 7, Dalila became a post-tropical cyclone and the NHC ceased to issue advisories on the storm.

The storm was a rain-maker for Mexico, and caused flooding in many regions. However, no major damage was reported.
Image Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC
Earth & Moon from Russian weather satellite Elektro-L No. 1, March 2011.  Via RussianSpaceWeb.

Earth & Moon from Russian weather satellite Elektro-L No. 1, March 2011. Via RussianSpaceWeb.

The shiny new MetOp-B weather satellite’s first image from its Advanced Scatterometer instrument, taken 9/25/2012.

The shiny new MetOp-B weather satellite’s first image from its Advanced Scatterometer instrument, taken 9/25/2012.

NOAA-19:  Current RGB composite image of polar clouds around Antarctica. 9/20/2012.

NOAA-19: Current RGB composite image of polar clouds around Antarctica. 9/20/2012.